I am a science and technology writer with eight years technical training and twenty years writing and journalism experience.  

My articles have appeared in publications and media outlets such as Wired, Discover, Science, Rolling Stone, New Scientist, IEEE Spectrum, Technology Review, Harper's, Scientific American, The Boston Globe, NationalGeographic.com, and PBS.org

My most recent book is The Day the World Discovered the Sun: An Extraordinary Story of Scientific Adventure and the Race to Track the Transit of Venus (Da Capo, 2012).

In addition to my writing experience, I've worked as a supercomputer programmer-analyst (at Cray Research, Inc.) and have completed graduate work in physics and astrophysics. As an undergraduate and graduate student, I interned and studied with research groups in food chemistry, atmospheric physics and pulsar astronomy. (The astronomer I studied under, in fact, also co-authored some of the "binary pulsar" studies that ultimately won the 1993 Nobel Prize in physics.) 

I'm a science and technology writer, in other words, who's also worked on the front lines of science and technology. 

My specialty is discovering the compelling stories behind particularly difficult and technical subjects. Examples include an investigation into autonomous military drones for Discoveran invited editorial for Wired magazine critiquing artificial intelligence hard-liners; and a rare, behind-the-scenes look at the chip that launched portable computing – Apple's A4 (what powered the original iPad & iPhone 4). 

I'm a Contributing Producer to the WNYC/Public Radio International program "Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen," Contributing Editor to IEEE Spectrum magazine and served as technical consultant to the Science Channel television show "Joao Magueijo's Big Bang" (May 2008).

 

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